Archive for the ‘Congress’ Category

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Oversight: Overlooked or Unhinged?

August 31, 2012

Reposted from bureauphile.

For the past thirty years, students of American government have leaned hard on a metaphor contrasting “police patrol” and “fire alarm” oversight. It’s an interesting and useful idea, but basically unsupported by careful empirical work. My esteemed colleague David C.W. Parker (who blogs about Montana politics here) and I have looked the partisan dimensions of congressional oversight in a couple academic articles – a 2009 article here published in Legislative Studies Quarterly and a forthcoming article in Political Research Quarterly. This summer we published a short essay, “Oversight: Overlooked or Unhinged?” in Extension of Remarks, the newsletter of the Legislative Studies Section of the American Political Science Association. It’s basically an effort to work through the critique of the “fire alarm” metaphor with an eye on current events. Did you miss it? Here it is again.

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bureauphile

June 21, 2012

Check it out.

 

 

 

 

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Workshop on Appointees – May 4-5th

May 2, 2012

This Thursday and Friday!

Appointee Politics and the Implications for Government Effectiveness

Indiana University’s School of Public and Environmental Affairs

and

The Center for Public Administration and Policy and the School of Public and International Affairs at Virginia Tech

Dates: May 4 and 5, 2012

Location: Alexandria, Virginia

Conveners:

Matthew Dull and Patrick Roberts, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University,

Center for Public Administration and Policy, School of Public and International

Affairs

William Resh, Indiana University, School of Public and Environmental Affairs

Registration: Andina Nagler, Virginia Tech (anagler@vt.edu)

Local Host: Patrick Roberts, Virginia Tech, (robertsp@vt.edu), 202-549-4987

Overview:

The workshop will engage scholars and government officials in empirical and theoretical questions about the role of Senate-confirmed appointees in American government. The workshop aims to build a community of scholars working on appointees, and it aims to connect scholars and government officials concerned about reforms to the appointment process. We hope this will be the first in a series of events.

Here’s the Workshop Agenda.

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Internet Protest and Support for SOPA

January 20, 2012

Cool graphic noted by Andrew Sullivan.

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Beat the market…

July 10, 2011

The John Schwartz in NYT reports on research showing members of Congress significantly outperform other stock market investors.

The authors suggest that members of Congress have access to “nonpublic information that could have a substantial impact on certain businesses, industries or the economy as a whole,” and that investing on that information “could yield significant personal trading profits.”

A cut above. Maybe the quality of our elected representatives isn’t so bad after all – they seem to be pretty smart investors!

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GAO

December 20, 2010

GAO building detail

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The Amazing Apportionment Machine

December 20, 2010

From the Official US Census Bureau Blog: “Through animation, the US Census Bureau helps explain how the apportionment formula is used to ensure equal representation for all, just like the Founding Fathers planned.” On NPR, the political context.